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MORPHEUS MUSIC INTERVIEW - FALLING YOU

16.10.08 - on release of Faith.

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Q: How did Falling You come about initially?   In 1996, I was creating ambient / ethereal music myself, when a friend asked if I would like to meet a vocalist friend of his. I was very intrigued, and that's when Jennifer came into the picture. We hit it off right away and have been very good friends ever since. When we were thinking of names for our project, we wanted something that alluded to the human-centric approach to the music, while at the same time suggestion a more ethereal connection.   Q:  What was the vision or impetus behind Faith?   Faith is such a maligned word in these times, and I am distressed by that. It's something we all wrestle with -- no matter what our personal belief systems are. We all want to believe in certain things despite there being a lack of evidence for it. Some put their faith in god(s) / goddesses, others like me put their faith in the goodness of humanity, but either way, when the world gets us down, we turn to what we put our faith in and try to find solace. Yet, life will invariably put us in situations where it knocks us off our high-wire and we question those beliefs, and sometimes what we thought was a safety net to stop us from falling to our ends was merely a sheet of glass that shattered as we plunged through it. When we finally hit bottom, we have to re-assess that which we held so dear. This is the dual nature of faith -- that it can provide us much comfort at times, yet completely betray us at others. Faith is so often used as a wedge to divide people, but by exploring this dual nature, I wanted to put forth the premise that it's actually something we all have in common, and like I said, we all deal with it, believer and secular alike.
     
             
Q:  What brief did you give the singers for Faith?
  I let them know the basic idea I was trying to explore, but I don't tell them what to sing / write / say. Falling You is a collaborative effort, and humanity is a varied tapestry of ideas and beliefs. So, each of them brings their own perspective on faith to the table, and I think the album is better for it.   Q: In what order do you create your tracks?

 

What comes first?

The music almost always comes first.


At what point do you involve the singers?

That depends on the vocalist -- sometimes they want to be a part of the music as it's evolving and changing, while other times they want something more fully formed.


When do you build the atmospherics?

Usually after the vocalists do their magic ... I do a basic song structure first, but once they've performed on it, I add a lot of the reverbs / other effects / atmospherics / occasional noise treatments / etc.


             
Q:  What makes a Falling You vocalist?
 

Oh, a lot of things :-) Firstly, talent -- I'm very fortunate to be able to work with this caliber of talent, and I heap as many accolades as I can upon them and hope others do, too. They're each incredible at what they do. Secondly, they have to be willing to work with me :-)

  Q:  Where does the sense of melancholy grace come from that pervades your music?   A lot of sources contribute to this I think. I'm a naturally introspective / reflective person, so that is part of it. Also, when I was growing up, my mother played a lot of Simon & Garfunkel and other melancholy folk music. I also just think there is a lot of beauty in grey skies, autumn winds, solitude, etc. It's very fertile ground to make music in.
             
 
     
Q:  As albums go by are you progressing toward a particular goal (if so what) or would you say your approach is more one of free exploration?
  Each album explores some core part of this human experience we all share, so my goal is to keep exploring them. Not all of them are melancholy, though ... for the next album, I want to explore a more positive vibe, because being human isn't always about being moody and introspective -- sometimes, we actually reach what we aspire to :-)   Q:  What would you like to do more of musically if there were no restrictions?   I don't feel at all restricted now, but things I would like to do someday would be to work with entire orchestras and choirs, record in huge empty spaces like churches, and work with more vocalists I deeply admire (Sarah Brightman, Lori Carson, Madonna (yes, I like her voice quite a lot), Allison Shaw, many others as well).
             
Q:  What part of the musical process do you enjoy most – technical matters, musical form, playing/performing, collaborating, listening? Why?   I think I enjoy the collaborative aspects the most. I love hearing what the vocalists bring to the music -- sometimes I have vocal ideas, but their ideas are almost always so much better :-)   Q:  What can we look forward to from Falling You in the future?  

 

Well, more music :-)

 

 

Thanks to Falling You's John Zorko for allowing us that interview.

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